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What 10-12-Year-Olds Really Think

<a href="/articles/what-10-12-year-olds-really-think">What 10-12-Year-Olds Really Think</a>

Findings from the fourth annual Small Voices, Big Dreams survey, commissioned by the ChildFund Alliance, uncovered the unique views of today’s 10-12-year-olds. Their ideas on violence, peace, heroes and happiness were explored in a survey that included nearly 6,500 children from 47 countries (36 developing; 11 developed), including 202 Australians. Read full article

Free Talk About the Impact of Violence and Trauma on Children

Join child psychiatry expert, Professor Louise Newman, in conversation with ABC Life Matters presenter, Natasha Mitchell, and a childcare trauma specialist as they explore the impact of violence and trauma on children’s development. This Next 200 Dialogue is hosted by The Benevolent Society, the State Library of NSW and Radio National. Read full article

Reducing Aggression by Teaching Teens that People Can Change

<a href="/articles/reducing-aggression-by-teaching-teens-that-people-can-change">Reducing Aggression by Teaching Teens that People Can Change</a>

When adults see media coverage of teens reacting aggressively to minor provocation, they often assume this behaviour is influenced by a teenager’s family background and experiences. And although a hostile family and school environment can contribute to aggressive behaviour, new research shows that the tendency of teens to act aggressively also depends on their belief about people’s ability or inability to change. This finding may help adults create education programs aimed at reducing violence and aggressive behaviour, and give parents important ideas on how to talk to children about people’s potential for change. Three key ideas for parents and teachers are included in this article. Read full article

Violent Toys for Kids - Surely There are Boundaries?

<a href="/blogs/yvettevignando/2013/02/12/violent-toys-for-kids-surely-there-are-boundaries">Violent Toys for Kids - Surely There are Boundaries?</a>

This was one of those segments where I was genuinely shocked - a toy maker selling a toy for a young child to "play" at robbing a bank. MSN reports "The toy features a bank manager, armed shooter, gold bars and a cash machine. In case kids can’t envision how to use the pieces, photos accompanying the set show the robber pointing a gun at the manager and forcing a blonde woman to empty the machine. Way to get those young, creative minds flowing." Read full article

Reporting on Gun Crimes? Leave Autism Out of It

<a href="/blogs/benisonoreilly/2013/01/25/reporting-on-gun-crimes-leave-autism-out-of-it">Reporting on Gun Crimes? Leave Autism Out of It</a>

I have an 11-year-old son with autism. His lack of social understanding means he can occasionally be insensitive; he embarrassed me the other day by loudly pointing out the “fat lady” at the supermarket. He’s also the sweetest kid in the world. For no particular reason he will hug me and say, I love you.” Our son is socially naive, a babe in the wood; much more likely to experience hurt than to hurt others. When the dreadful news of the Sandy Hook massacre in Newtown, Connecticut, came through I crossed my fingers and hoped the words ‘autistic’ or ‘Asperger’s’ would not enter the equation, as they had after the 2007 Virginia Tech shootings. Read full article

The Impact of Media - Yes, Somebody Should Think of the Children

<a href="/blogs/elizabethhandsley/2011/11/18/the-impact-of-media-yes-somebody-should-think-of-the-children">The Impact of Media - Yes, Somebody Should Think of the Children</a>

This morning I had an article about media content classification published on a website.* The article discusses some proposed deregulatory changes to the Australian classification system and points out that these do not appear to serve the review’s guiding principle that "children should be protected from material that is likely to harm or disturb them." The first comment out of the blocks was: "Somebody think of the children!" Read full article

Call me a Prude? But I Feel Enraged, Perplexed and Powerless.

<a href="/blogs/michelle-higgins/2011/07/08/call-me-a-prude-but-i-feel-enraged-perplexed-and-powerless">Call me a Prude? But I Feel Enraged, Perplexed and Powerless.</a>

I recently took my children to a film at a mainstream cinema complex. And while the content of the film made us laugh and even warmed the heart a little, the walk through the lobby left me feeling enraged, perplexed and powerless. Call me a prude, but I don’t think that my children need to be assaulted by R-rated imagery, including equipment, on their way to a G-rated film. That imagery was not of a s*xual nature, and if it had been it would never have been allowed within the sight line of a group of children under the age of twelve, or even eighteen. Instead, the imagery was uncensored unadulterated violence. Read full article

Non Violent Playstation Games for Teens. Where are they?

<a href="/blogs/yvettevignando/2011/07/04/non-violent-playstation-games-for-teens-where-are-they">Non Violent Playstation Games for Teens. Where are they?</a>

Who else has this problem? This one always comes to a head in our house during the school holidays. Where are the entertaining and challenging and fun Playstation Games for teenage boys? I confess I have not done thorough research on this topic but having two teen boys in our house means that this question is frequently raised. Perhaps more than some parents, I am very careful about what I allow our teenage boys to play online or on the Playstation. Read full article

My Child is Being Bullied - He's Four - My Heart Hurts

<a href="/blogs/meganstanish/2011/02/14/my-child-is-being-bullied-hes-four-my-heart-hurts">My Child is Being Bullied - He&#039;s Four - My Heart Hurts</a>

My Bear is 4-1/2 years old, and he is a sweet, bookish child who makes a point of sharing and complimenting and thanking. Every time he is given something – a lollipop at the doctor or a piece of candy at swimming lessons or a toy – he insists on getting something for his little sister, too. And for 2 years now, he has been the target for aggressive kids. I hate labeling it “bullying.” Whenever I do refer to what happens to him as bullying, the whole thing seems so harsh, so huge … my heart hurts too much. Because he’s 4-1/2 years old. Read full article