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Smacking Young Children Linked to Poor Behaviour

<a href="/articles/smacking-young-children-linked-to-poor-behaviour">Smacking Young Children Linked to Poor Behaviour</a>

The newly released study, Spanking and Child Development Across the First Decade of Life published by the American Academy of Paediatrics, found that smacking children up to the age of 5 predicted negative outcomes for children by age 9. In particular, those negative outcomes are more "externalising behaviour" (this means outward expressions of problematic behaviour like aggression) and less "receptive vocabulary" ( this means the words that can be understood by a child but not necessarily expressed in speech or writing) . Read full article

Reducing Aggression by Teaching Teens that People Can Change

<a href="/articles/reducing-aggression-by-teaching-teens-that-people-can-change">Reducing Aggression by Teaching Teens that People Can Change</a>

When adults see media coverage of teens reacting aggressively to minor provocation, they often assume this behaviour is influenced by a teenager’s family background and experiences. And although a hostile family and school environment can contribute to aggressive behaviour, new research shows that the tendency of teens to act aggressively also depends on their belief about people’s ability or inability to change. This finding may help adults create education programs aimed at reducing violence and aggressive behaviour, and give parents important ideas on how to talk to children about people’s potential for change. Three key ideas for parents and teachers are included in this article. Read full article

Violence in Video Games - What Parents Need to Know

<a href="/articles/violence-in-video-games-what-parents-need-to-know">Violence in Video Games - What Parents Need to Know</a>

Although strongly challenged by well-credentialed researchers of the opposing view, a considerable body of research supports the view that children’s and adults’ exposure to violent media, including violent video games, increases the risk of verbal and physical aggression. And a 2012 Report of the Media Violence Commission, highlights the need for parents to be thoughtful about their children’s exposure to violent media. This article includes the risks to children, parenting ideas to minimise harm, and coverage of the contrary view, that the risk of exposure to violent media may be overstated. Read full article

Should I Worry About My Child's Tantrums?

<a href="/articles/should-i-worry-about-my-childs-tantrums">Should I Worry About My Child&#039;s Tantrums?</a>

Toddlers’ tantrums are exhausting for parents. Unsure of whether to ignore a tantrum, when to step in and calm a child, and dealing with judgemental stares from onlookers, parents with tantrum-prone toddlers often despair at the challenges they face. It is normal for young children to get very upset when they are frustrated, angry and disappointed and it is also very difficult for toddlers to calm down once they get very worked up. Northwestern University’s School of Medicine is developing a new assessment tool for paediatricians and parents called the Multidimensional Assessment of Preschool Disruptive Behavior (MAP-DB). The MAP-DB is intended to help parents find out if their child’s tantrums could be an indicator of other problems. Read full article

Warm Parenting Helps 'Callous or Unemotional' Children

In this video from Mornings at Channel 9, Yvette Vignando on the parenting panel with Dannielle Miller and Tracey Spicer talking about research lead by Dr David Hawes from the University of Sydney about the kind of warm and positive parenting that can help children with what is known as "callous and unemotional" (CU) traits. Also discussed: parents who are in a dispute over their child and a father has been ordered to stop weighing his daughter as it affects her self esteem. Read full article

My Child is Hitting, Biting, Pushing - Helping Children with Aggression

<a href="/articles/my-child-is-hitting-biting-pushing-helping-children-with-aggression">My Child is Hitting, Biting, Pushing - Helping Children with Aggression</a>

Has your child ever lashed out and hurt someone? Has another aggressive child ever bothered him? If your answer is yes, join the crowd! Almost all of us struggle with understanding and helping our children when they hurt others, and when they are hurt by other children. It's a shock to us the first time our sweet sons and daughters suddenly bite someone, or throw something at the new baby in the family. Here are some guiding principles for understanding and relieving children's aggression, so they can relax and enjoy their friends and siblings. Read full article