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An Anti-Bullying App for Children from Australian Education Authorities

<a href="/articles/an-anti-bullying-app-for-children-from-australian-education-authorities">An Anti-Bullying App for Children from Australian Education Authorities</a>

The Allen Adventure iPad™ app is developed by the Safe and Supportive School Communities Working Group—made up of all Australian education authorities – to help children 3-8 years of age develop social and emotional skills. Described as fun and positive, it is designed as an interactive story about a young visitor from another planet who is new to school and is learning how to get on with his Earthling classmates. Through discussion with parents and educators, children can learn how to manage a variety of social situations, like making friends, getting on with others and dealing with difficult behaviours from other children. Read full article

Reducing Aggression by Teaching Teens that People Can Change

<a href="/articles/reducing-aggression-by-teaching-teens-that-people-can-change">Reducing Aggression by Teaching Teens that People Can Change</a>

When adults see media coverage of teens reacting aggressively to minor provocation, they often assume this behaviour is influenced by a teenager’s family background and experiences. And although a hostile family and school environment can contribute to aggressive behaviour, new research shows that the tendency of teens to act aggressively also depends on their belief about people’s ability or inability to change. This finding may help adults create education programs aimed at reducing violence and aggressive behaviour, and give parents important ideas on how to talk to children about people’s potential for change. Three key ideas for parents and teachers are included in this article. Read full article