Newsletter Subscription

Regular Updates on Parenting, Happy Children & Emotional Intelligence

  • Latest Articles - Raising Children with Emotional Intelligence
  • New Parenting Blogs
  • Parenting Tips for Happy Children
  • Free Online Seminars
  • Popular Parenting Books & Reviews

Subscribe!

Regular Updates on Parenting, Happy Children & Emotional Intelligence

  • Latest Articles - Raising Children with Emotional Intelligence
  • New Parenting Blogs
  • Parenting Tips for Happy Children
  • Free Online Seminars
  • Popular Parenting Books & Reviews

CAPTCHA
This question is for testing whether you are a human visitor and to prevent automated spam submissions.
Image CAPTCHA
Enter the characters shown in the image.
Unsubscribe

Proudly Supporting

Proudly Supporting

Don't Chase Your Happiness - Let it Land on You

<a href="/blogs/yvettevignando/2012/05/17/dont-chase-your-happiness-let-it-land-on-you">Don&#039;t Chase Your Happiness - Let it Land on You</a>

It was a little difficult for me to compose a blogpost mainly about happiness because I don’t believe in chasing it. This might seem ironic coming from the publisher of a website called happychild. But happiness is just one of many rich feelings that give me, and I think most people, a feeling of humanity and a sense of living a full and meaningful life. When happiness is absent in our daily lives or is fleeting, that’s a sign that something is more seriously wrong – and it’s the time to get support from experts, not the time to chase happiness. Because if you run after happiness you may never catch it. Read full article

Children Tell Adults about What Makes Them Feel Happy

<a href="/blogs/yvettevignando/2011/10/28/children-tell-adults-about-what-makes-them-feel-happy">Children Tell Adults about What Makes Them Feel Happy</a>

“…if I could ask any child what they would like in the world I would definitely ask it. I think it would be interesting to find out what everyone’s ideas are. What they want…” (14-year old girl). When we are asked what we want most for our children, most of us will answer “happiness”. Asking children about what contributes to their feelings of wellbeing reveals some insightful answers to how we can provide that happy life. A study, conducted by the NSW Commission for Children and Young People and published in 2007, highlighted the importance of adults using parenting and educational practices that promote children’s emotional and social well-being. Read full article

What Do You Most Want For Your Children?

<a href="/blogs/yvettevignando/2010/12/03/what-do-you-most-want-for-your-children">What Do You Most Want For Your Children?</a>

One of the main reasons I changed careers (from lawyer to executive coaching and now parenting publishing) was because I became a parent. I loved many things about being a lawyer, but there were a few other things pressing on my mind and heart ...I read Daniel Goleman’s book Emotional Intelligence, Why It Can Matter More than IQ and felt instantly that the ideas in that book represented the path to what I wanted most for our children: happiness and fulfilment, people to love them and people for them to love. Read full article

Learned Optimism

<a href="/parenting-resources/optimism/learned-optimism">Learned Optimism</a>

Book: Learned Optimism by Martin Seligman. An authority on positive psychology and motivation writes about the positive effects of optimism on the quality of life and provides a program of specific exercises designed to break the pessimism habit and help with depression, while developing an optimistic outlook. Read full article

Sad Children Outperform Happy Children. Really?

<a href="/blogs/yvettevignando/2010/09/24/sad-children-outperform-happy-children-really">Sad Children Outperform Happy Children. Really?</a>

Last year I was drawn to a series of articles referring to research from the Universities of Virginia (United States) and Plymouth (United Kingdom) suggesting that for children, happiness may not always mean good academic results. If you have read Martin Seligman’s work on optimism and its value for children’s wellbeing and later success in life, this suggestion could leave you scratching your head and wondering. Read full article

The Optimistic Child

<a href="/parenting-resources/depression-and-bipolar/the-optimistic-child">The Optimistic Child</a>

Book: The Optimistic Child by Martin Seligman.This book shows adults how to teach children the skills of optimism These skills can help them combat depression and achieve more academically, in sports and improve their physical health. Read full article

Raising an Optimistic Child

<a href="/articles/raising-an-optimistic-child">Raising an Optimistic Child</a>

Margie Sheedy writes about the very important skill of optimistic thinking for children. Teaching your child about responding to adversity and identifying their strengths is part of the process. Read some tips on helping your child to have an optimistic outlook. Read full article

What is Optimism? A Quick Guide for Parents.

<a href="/articles/what-is-optimism-a-quick-guide-for-parents">What is Optimism? A Quick Guide for Parents.</a>

Optimism describes a habit of thinking. A child who thinks that bad events are caused by temporary things (such as their mood) and that good events are caused by permanent things (such as being someone who always works hard) has an optimistic way of thinking. In his brilliant book, The Optimistic Child, Dr Martin Seligman gives several examples of this way of thinking. Read full article