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Take a Seat - Make a Friend - Try this in a School?

<a href="/articles/take-a-seat-make-a-friend-try-this-in-a-school">Take a Seat - Make a Friend - Try this in a School?</a>

A beautiful video from Soul Pancake called "Take a Seat - Make a Friend". We think this would be a brilliant exercise for a Primary or Elementary school to help children get to know each other, make friends, and appreciate diversity. This is great. Take 5 minutes and enjoy this. Read full article

Why BFFs - Best Friends 'Forever' - are Good for Children

<a href="/articles/why-bffs-best-friends-forever-are-good-for-children">Why BFFs - Best Friends &#039;Forever&#039; - are Good for Children</a>

Anyone helped through hard times by a close friend knows how much that support meant to them, but do close childhood friendships play an important role in long-term emotional development? Dr William Bukowski, Professor in the Department of Psychology at Concordia University, Canada, has researched how experiences with close peers affect a child’s social competence and wellbeing. His research indicates that friendships have a protective impact on our children’s emotional wellbeing by affecting how a child’s brain deals with stress immediately after a negative event. Read full article

Finding Friends Can Sometimes Mean Losing Friends

<a href="/blogs/carolduncan/2012/03/07/finding-friends-can-sometimes-mean-losing-friends">Finding Friends Can Sometimes Mean Losing Friends</a>

Are there any kids at your school that you’re glad your own children aren’t friends with? Do you keep an eagle-eye on the friends your child does make and, well, judge the friend just a little bit? Carol Duncan reminds her boys how to make, keep, and sometimes let go of, friends. Read full article

We Can Get Along

<a href="/parenting-resources/making-friends/we-can-get-along">We Can Get Along</a>

Book: "We Can Get Along" by Lauren Payne. This book teaches essential skills - think before you speak or act, treat others the way you want to be treated - in a way that even very young children can understand. There is a focus on kindness and respect, tolerance and responsibility. Through pictures and words, this book promotes peaceful behaviours and positive conflict resolution. Read full article

Permission Marketing Becomes Permission Socialising for Kids

<a href="/blogs/yvettevignando/2010/07/04/permission-marketing-becomes-permission-socialising-for-kids">Permission Marketing Becomes Permission Socialising for Kids</a>

The other day a 12 year old told me that looking up a friend's telephone number in a phone book (online or offline) was "stalking". Apparently it's okay to call a friend if their number is in your mobile phone, but otherwise, contacting a friend without warning or invitation on their home number is "creepy". Wow, things have changed. Or have they? Read full article

Thriving at School 2nd Edition

<a href="/parenting-resources/academic-success/thriving-at-school-2nd-edition">Thriving at School 2nd Edition</a>

Book: Thriving at School by John Stewart and John Irvine. An accessible, practical guide to help parents develop their children's attitudes, values and good habits in the early school years, helping them to thrive as happy learners. The authors consider ways to help a child succeed in the classroom, be stimulated to learn, deal with difficulties in the playground, and get on well with others at school and at home. Read full article

Getting On With Others How to Teach Your Child Essential Social Skills

<a href="/parenting-resources/making-friends/getting-on-with-others-how-to-teach-your-child-essential-social-s">Getting On With Others How to Teach Your Child Essential Social Skills</a>

Book: Getting On With Others by John Cooper.Cooperative children do better at school and in life. They learn how to make friends, manage their emotions and solve problems with others. A book that shows parents how to teach their children social skills, problem solving and co-operative behaviour and how to help children learn about feelings and handle conflict. Read full article

How to Help Your Child Make Friends

<a href="/articles/how-to-help-your-child-make-friends">How to Help Your Child Make Friends</a>

Most parents worry about whether their child has enough friends or the right friends at school. Margie Sheedy writes about the important skill of making friends and shares some tips from Dr John Irvine. Read full article