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Why Have Good Parents Gone Bad?

Mogel offers an 18-step program called Overparenting Anonymous on her website. She highlights these strategies:

W.A.I.T – Why Am I Talking?
Before you nag, criticize, chime in or over-explain, remember W.A.I.T.

Be alert, but not automatically alarmed.
Child:   “Mum, I’m bleeding!”
Parent: “Badly?”
Ask yourself – is this an emergency or a new challenge?

Q.T.I.P. – Quit Taking It Personally
Home is a soft landing with the people they know and love,” explains Dr Mogel. Kids can keep it together all day for strangers, then come home to a safe place to let out all their stress.

Accept A.S.T. – Adolescent Standard Time
Your teenagers may be worried you have dementia with all the repeating you do. Accept with older children that things will get done on AST.

Give Kids Time to Play
“Let’s avoid a class action from children suing their parents for stealing their childhoods.”

Mogel says that in the trenches of a typical day, effective parenting perspectives and practices can lead to raising self-reliant, good-hearted children and teenagers. Throw in some good humour and warmth and the journey is easier to navigate.

Mogel finishes her presentation with a wry smile. “Teenagers are getting ready for the journey of life,” she remarks. “Their senior year is God’s gift of making it easier to say goodbye.”

* Jean Piaget is a clinical psychologist, whose famous studies in 1920s and 1930s found that children under the age of around 9 months consider an object to have disappeared if they can no longer see it i.e. it has no permanency and no longer exists.

Image from freedigitalphotos.net