Newsletter Subscription

Regular Updates on Parenting, Happy Children & Emotional Intelligence

  • Latest Articles - Raising Children with Emotional Intelligence
  • New Parenting Blogs
  • Parenting Tips for Happy Children
  • Free Online Seminars
  • Popular Parenting Books & Reviews

Subscribe!

Regular Updates on Parenting, Happy Children & Emotional Intelligence

  • Latest Articles - Raising Children with Emotional Intelligence
  • New Parenting Blogs
  • Parenting Tips for Happy Children
  • Free Online Seminars
  • Popular Parenting Books & Reviews

CAPTCHA
This question is for testing whether you are a human visitor and to prevent automated spam submissions.
Image CAPTCHA
Enter the characters shown in the image.
Unsubscribe

Proudly Supporting

Proudly Supporting

If Child Labour is not Okay in Australia

Take a look at a table about the percentage of children in child labour around the world. It’s very confronting. 

Now think about this: there are over 4.1 million children in Australia under 15 years old. Imagine if over 780,000 of those were engaged in child labour – it would be intolerable. Yet across Asia and the Pacific, it’s estimated that 19% of children are working. 

Child Labour Across the World

And UNICEF estimates that over 215 million children worldwide are involved in child labour. This figure could be even higher as it’s difficult to know how many young women in particular, are engaged in domestic work, one of the most common and traditional forms of work for children. Child domestic workers are especially vulnerable to exploitation as they are away from the public eye and we know they are often exploited by working long hours, and sometimes subject to physical, emotional and sexual abuse.

Here are some statistics from our neighbours: 13% of Bangladeshi children are working and 37% of Cambodian children are working - further away, 49% of Somalian children are working.

Child Labour Appeal

Earlier this year UNICEF Australia launched its child labour appeal by showing Australians just what it looks like when young children are sent out to work – people were of course surprised. Take a look at the video at the bottom of this article and listen as people exclaim “What are you doing? These children shouldn’t be working!” and “I thought we weren’t allowed to do that in Australia any more.”

There are many ways UNICEF helps children to escape a life of child labour. Working in countries to have legislation drafted to protect children from exploitation, working locally to help disarm and reintegrate child soldiers into their communities, and delivering parent education, are three ways UNICEF makes a difference.

UNICEF’s approach is not to oppose children working altogether. If a child or teenager’s participation in work does not damage their health or interrupt their education, international laws do permit work from the age of 12 years old.

Worst Forms of Child Labour

UNICEF’s child labour appeal is not just about asking Australians to help eradicate children working in the fields all day – an activity that deprives a child of education and play. The appeal also targets the work of UNICEF in preventing and eradicating the worst forms of child labour: slavery, drug trafficking, prostitution and other activities that are likely to harm the health, safety and morals of children. Countries that support the International Labour Organisation’s child labour elimination targets can use an ILO training guide for monitoring, evaluation and legislative change.

Child Labour Not Allowed in Australia

So if it’s not okay for our children to be working out on the paths of Circular Quay, Sydney, as you’ll see in the video below, we should be working towards child labour not being okay anywhere.

Because, yes, every child in the world, has a right to a better future. Please consider donating to the UNICEF child labour appeal.