Newsletter Subscription

Regular Updates on Parenting, Happy Children & Emotional Intelligence

  • Latest Articles - Raising Children with Emotional Intelligence
  • New Parenting Blogs
  • Parenting Tips for Happy Children
  • Free Online Seminars
  • Popular Parenting Books & Reviews

Subscribe!

Regular Updates on Parenting, Happy Children & Emotional Intelligence

  • Latest Articles - Raising Children with Emotional Intelligence
  • New Parenting Blogs
  • Parenting Tips for Happy Children
  • Free Online Seminars
  • Popular Parenting Books & Reviews

CAPTCHA
This question is for testing whether you are a human visitor and to prevent automated spam submissions.
Image CAPTCHA
Enter the characters shown in the image.
Unsubscribe

Proudly Supporting

Proudly Supporting

How Your Words Can Shape Your Child's Helping Behaviour

To 'help' or to' be a helper'? That is the question that researchers from University of California, University of Washington, and Stanford University studied in their efforts to understand if an adult's choice of words influence helping behaviour in preschoolers.

And it seems that grammar matters. When children (aged 3-6 years old) were divided into two play groups and asked to either 'help' or 'be a helper' in packing away and tidying activities, children who heard the noun, helper, helped significantly more than children who heard the verb, help. The researchers also gathered baseline data, to determine to what extent children were helping without being asked. Children who heard the verb wording didn't help any more than when no request for help was made at all.

So can getting a preschooler to help with chores and tasks really be as simple as using the noun wording and not the verb? “These findings suggest that parents and teachers can encourage young children to be more helpful by using nouns like helper instead of verbs like helping when making a request of a child,” says researcher Christopher J. Bryan, assistant professor of psychology at the University of California, San Diego.

When it comes to getting children to help, Professor Bryan suggests the positive role of becoming a helper may be a motivator. “Using the noun helper may send a signal that helping implies something positive about one’s identity, which may in turn motivate children to help more.”

The study of 150 children is published in Child Development journal.

Image from freedigitalphotos.net